How To Get Consumer Financing When You Have Bad Credit

Being a consumer today is more difficult than ever before.

Remember the days when you carried a wallet full of credit cards ready to take on the world? There was no emergency that could catch you unprepared.

Well, those days are long gone.

Perhaps you had your spending power vanish when the credit card companies panicked and crushed your credit limits. Perhaps you lost your job for a time causing you to temporarily fall behind on some bills and therefore, destroying your credit score. And perhaps, you no longer have that job that leaves you with any much extra income to save for those emergencies.

The end result is that you are walking around afraid that life will throw you a curve and you won’t have the resources to deal with it. What if your car breaks down requiring a costly repair? Or you have a health issue that requires a significant out of pocket expense? And what if something breaks in your home that costs thousands of dollars to fix?

It’s not a fun position to be in.

But if misery likes company, you certainly have plenty of it.

According to a survey conducted by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, 64% of Americans claim they don’t have enough cash on hand to handle a $1,000 emergency expense.

This is frightening.

Think of all the things that can go wrong in your life that can ultimately cost more than $1,000.

What would happen if you woke up one morning and your tooth was in excruciating pain? You get yourself to the dentist and find out you need root canal. The cost? A few thousand dollars.

Or maybe, your dog or cat gets sick.

What would you do?

Some businesses, but not many, have decided to work with people with minimal resources. Unfortunately, they are few and far between.

If you walk into most health professionals, they will point you toward Care Credit, a consumer financing option arm of GE Capital.

But here’s the problem. Unless your credit score is 680 or higher (and if you’re still reading at this point, chances are it’s not), you will likely get declined. And approximately 70 percent of applications submitted to Care Credit are either declined or approved for an amount less than requested.

Those are not great odds.

But the purpose of this article is not to get you depressed. It’s to tell you that an answer may exist at a business near you and if not, if will very soon.

There’s a new form of merchant consumer financing that does not base approvals on credit scores at all. Instead, they focus on your most recent checking account history.

This form of financing cleverly determines risk in new way. If you have an established checking account used to pay bills and have avoided being insufficient in your account over the previous 90 days, you stand a very good chance of getting approved.

Businesses that offer this option can typically get an answer on your simple seven line application in less than ten minutes. You won’t be required to produce pay stubs or bank statements either. One personal check and a photo id is all you will need.

So, your days of living in a home that requires maintenance, driving around in a car that’s in disrepair or walking around in pain, may soon be a thing of the past.

In the not too distant future, a business offering a non-credit based in-house payment option will be as common as one accepting credit cards. Until then, when the need arises call a business and ask them if they offer it and if not, suggest they do, so you can get what you want and they can get a new customer.